Supreme Court in US hands Trump a victory on immigration detention

Supreme Court on Tuesday endorsed the U.S. government’s authority to detain immigrants awaiting deportation anytime – potentially even years – after they have completed prison terms for criminal convictions, handing President Donald Trump a victory as he pursues hardline immigration policies.

The court ruled 5-4 along ideological lines, with its conservative justices in the majority and its liberal justices dissenting, that federal authorities could pick up such immigrants and place them into indefinite detention anytime, not just immediately after they finish their prison sentences.

The ruling, authored by conservative Justice Samuel Alito, left open the possibility that some individual immigrants could challenge their detention.

These immigrants potentially could argue that the use of the 1996 federal law involved in the case, the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, against them long after finishing their sentences would violate their due process rights under the U.S. Constitution.

The law states the government can detain convicted immigrants “when the alien is released” from criminal detention. Civil rights lawyers argued that the language of the law shows that it applies only immediately after immigrants are released.

The Trump administration said the government should have the power to detain such immigrants anytime.

It is not the court’s job, Alito wrote, to impose a time limit for when immigrants can be detained after serving a prison sentence.

Alito noted that the court has said in the past that “an official’s crucial duties are better carried out late than never.”

Alito said the challengers’ assertion that immigrants had to be detained within 24 hours of ending a prison sentence is “especially hard to swallow.”

In dissent, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer questioned whether the U.S. Congress when it wrote the law “meant to allow the government to apprehend persons years after their release from prison and hold them indefinitely without a bail hearing.”

Tuesday’s decision follows a February 2018 ruling in a similar case in which the conservative majority, over liberal dissent, curbed the ability of immigrants held in long-term detention during deportation proceedings to argue for release.

‘MOST EXTREME INTERPRETATION’
Cecilia Wang, the American Civil Liberties Union lawyer who argued the newly decided case for the challengers, said that in both rulings “the Supreme Court has endorsed the most extreme interpretation of immigration detention statutes, allowing mass incarceration of people without any hearing, simply because they are defending themselves against a deportation charge.”

Trump has backed limits on legal and illegal immigrants since taking office in January 2017.

Kerri Kupec, a U.S. Justice Department spokeswoman, said administration officials were pleased with the ruling.

In both of the detention cases, the Supreme Court reversed the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a liberal leaning court that Trump has frequently criticized.

In each case, litigation against the federal government started before Trump took office.

In the latest case, the administration had appealed a 2016 9th Circuit ruling that favored immigrants, a decision it said would undermine the government’s ability to deport immigrants who have committed crimes.

The appeals court had said that convicted immigrants who are not immediately detained by immigration authorities after finishing their sentences but then later picked by immigration authorities could seek bond hearings to argue for their release.

The plaintiffs included two legal U.S. residents involved in separate lawsuits filed in 2013, a Cambodian immigrant named Mony Preap convicted of marijuana possession and a Palestinian immigrant named Bassam Yusuf Khoury convicted of attempting to manufacture a controlled substance.

Under federal immigration law, immigrants convicted of certain offenses are subject to mandatory detention during their deportation process.

They can be held indefinitely without a bond hearing after completing their sentences.

In the most significant immigration-related case recently before the court, the conservative justices were also in the majority in June 2018 when they upheld on a 5-4 vote Trump’s travel ban on targeting people from several Muslim-majority countries.

But in April 2018, conservative Trump appointee Neil Gorsuch joined with the court’s four liberal justices in a 5-4 ruling that could hinder the administration’s ability to step up the removal of immigrants with criminal records, invalidating a provision in another law, the Immigration and Nationality Act.

3,685 thoughts on “Supreme Court in US hands Trump a victory on immigration detention

  1. I’ve been exploring for a bit for any high-quality articles or blog posts
    on this kind of space . Exploring in Yahoo I at last stumbled
    upon this site. Reading this information So i am happy to convey
    that I’ve an incredibly just right uncanny feeling I came upon just what I needed.
    I so much unquestionably will make sure to don?t overlook this
    web site and provides it a glance regularly.

  2. We’re a gaggle of volunteers and starting a new scheme in our community.
    Your site offered us with helpful info to work on. You have done a
    formidable activity and our entire community will probably be grateful
    to you.

  3. You’re so cool! I do not suppose I’ve truly read something like this before.
    So great to find somebody with unique thoughts
    on this issue. Really.. many thanks for starting
    this up. This web site is one thing that is needed on the web,
    someone with a bit of originality!

  4. When I initially commented I clicked the “Notify me when new comments are added” checkbox and now each time a
    comment is added I get four e-mails with the same comment.
    Is there any way you can remove people from that service?
    Thanks a lot!

  5. Tremendous things here. I am very glad to see your post. Thanks a lot
    and I am looking forward to contact you. Will you please drop me a mail?

  6. Hmm it seems like your website ate my first comment (it was extremely long) so I guess I’ll
    just sum it up what I wrote and say, I’m thoroughly enjoying your blog.

    I too am an aspiring blog writer but I’m still new to the whole thing.
    Do you have any tips and hints for beginner
    blog writers? I’d genuinely appreciate it.

  7. I will right away grasp your rss feed as I can’t to find your e-mail subscription link or e-newsletter service.

    Do you have any? Kindly permit me understand so that I may subscribe.
    Thanks.

  8. I simply couldn’t go away your website prior to suggesting that I
    really enjoyed the usual information a person provide for your
    guests? Is gonna be back ceaselessly in order to inspect new
    posts

  9. I was recommended this website through my cousin. I’m now not sure whether
    this post is written via him as nobody else realize such distinctive about my trouble.

    You are amazing! Thanks!

  10. This is the right blog for everyone who would like to
    understand this topic. You know a whole lot its almost hard to argue with you (not
    that I actually will need to…HaHa). You certainly put a brand new spin on a topic that’s been discussed for many years.

    Great stuff, just wonderful!

  11. Whats up this is kinda of off topic but I was wondering if blogs use
    WYSIWYG editors or if you have to manually code with HTML.
    I’m starting a blog soon but have no coding expertise so I wanted to
    get guidance from someone with experience. Any help would
    be greatly appreciated!

  12. Its such as you read my mind! You seem to understand a lot about this, like you wrote the book in it or
    something. I believe that you simply could do with a few p.c.
    to drive the message house a little bit, but other than that, this is great blog.

    A great read. I will certainly be back.

  13. Wow that was odd. I just wrote an incredibly long comment but after I clicked submit my comment didn’t appear.
    Grrrr… well I’m not writing all that over
    again. Anyhow, just wanted to say great blog!

  14. Do you mind if I quote a few of your posts as long as
    I provide credit and sources back to your website?
    My blog is in the very same area of interest as yours and my users would definitely benefit from some of the information you present here.
    Please let me know if this ok with you. Cheers!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Notice: ob_end_flush(): failed to send buffer of zlib output compression (0) in /home/loudspea/public_html/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4757